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How to Get Noticed in Job Market 2.0

Today on The Bigg Success Show, we welcomed Phil Rosenberg. Phil is the founder of reCareered, a career coaching service that helps job searchers get past the biggest challenge in today’s competitive jobs market – to get noticed.

 

Phil, what does reCareered mean?

 

 

It means someone who is seeking a job change, or trying to revitalize their career, or someone who is between jobs and wants help with how the job markets have changed in the last eight years or so.

 

How has the job market changed?

 

 

Eight years ago, the majority of resumes were delivered on paper. Around 2000, it changed to where most resumes were delivered digitally.

 

And how does that change the resume itself?

 

 

It changes it completely. The paper-based resume had to be static. The only way to customize it was by a cover letter. A digital resume can be searched. It also increased the number of resumes that went into most companies, by as many as ten-fold.

 

We always hear about search engine optimization and how you want to rank at the tops of the pages for Google. But apparently you can do the same for your resume … it can be optimized?

 

You bet, and it’s especially critical in today’s world. Most major employers get thousands of resumes for each job, but they only staff to look at twenty to thirty. That’s two to three percent. So your goal, in submitting your resume today, is getting to the top two or three percent. Through resume search optimization, you can manage that process rather than have it be random. My strategy with my clients is to make a resume a single-use document – to have it infinitely customizable so that you’re gaming the search engine and forcing it higher up the search page.

 

How do we make a good impression right upfront?

 

 

There’s been research from the University of Toledo and Stanford University that states that interview decisions are made within the first two to thirty seconds. That blew me away. The rest of the interview is just somebody justifying their initial decision. So it’s a “gut feel” decision that may occur even before you shake hands. It’s all about preparation. Learn about your client – how they communicate (verbally and non-verbally), how they dress, how they look. If you want a job, go to a place that’s close to their office and sit there during lunch. Talk to people from that company who are getting lunch there. On a Friday night, go to Happy Hour at a bar close to their office and talk to people from that company. When you talk to them, watch their body movements. What’s the tone they use? What’s the speed they use to talk? You can also do that with their written communication – their web site, annual reports, press releases. The key to all this is communicating to your audience that it seems like you already work there.

 

It reminds me of the book, Guerilla Selling. It’s all about learning about your customer, in that case, but in the case the employer you’re going after – getting as much information as you can, wherever you can. It’s amazing how much information you can gather.

 

Sure. That’s also an effective way to use LinkedIn, Facebook or your own personal network. Chances are you have contacts within that company. A lot of people only use those contacts to see what jobs are available and to ask them to pass their resume along. They leave out some of the greatest uses of a network – talking to people within an organization to find out what an organization is like and what the communication style is like. Listening for how they’re answering questions rather than just what they’re saying.

 

This is fantastic advice because you do want to fit in. It’s all about mimicking. When you’re at an interview, should you sit up straight and lean forward or should you try to have your body language be similar to the body language of the interviewer? From what I’ve read, you should try to mimic that person.

 

That’s exactly what you’re doing – it’s called mirroring. You’re trying to show that you fit in. You speak the same language. You’re really trying to act like you already work at the company. It takes a ton of preparation. A lot of people aren’t willing to put that preparation in, but the people who do get a huge, almost an unfair, advantage.

Phil's links

You can get free daily job tips from Phil at his blog or visit his main site, reCareered, the place for resume search optimization and job search 2.0. 

 

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I Want to Start a Home-Based Business. How Do I Make Sure It's Legitimate?

With tough times, people are looking for ways to either save a little or make a little more money. We’ve been getting more questions about part-time and/or home-based business opportunities. Specifically, we’re being asked how to tell if they’re legitimate.

One of the first things to look at is what they’re promising you. Specifically …

Do they make earnings claims?

george "Many offers will tout how much you can make. Legitimate operators will do one of two things: they won’t make any claim at all, or … they will tell you both the number and percentage of people who actually earn what they’re claiming. In my experience, they’re more likely to not make any claim at all."

Some real world examples

marylynn "I did a search for “home based business opportunities.” I saw six on my screen without scrolling down. Of those six, five made an earnings claim. I saw claims like “$250 thousand or more at home”, “$500 to $8,000 per month”, and $30 to $150 thousand in 12 months”. Then I looked at the most regulated business opportunities – franchises. I typed in “franchise opportunities”. One out of the four franchise opportunities made an earnings claim and it was also one of the home-based business opportunities!"

biz_ad

We’re not saying that being a franchise automatically makes it a legitimate opportunity. Nor are we saying that just because it’s not a franchise means it’s a scam. But from these examples, you do see differences in behaviors of companies that are more regulated and those that are not.

Do they stand behind their own claims?

marylynn "I went to the site of one of the home-based business opportunities. This was the one that claimed you could make $250 thousand. I scrolled way, way, down to the bottom of the page and clicked on the tiny, little link that said 'Earnings Disclaimer'."

george "Mary-Lynn printed it out. It was in ALL CAPS. Unlike the small font used for the Earnings Disclaimer, this was in 13.5 point type. They’re covering their you-know-what."

Here are some highlights …

“ANY EARNINGS OR INCOME STATEMENTS,  OR EARNINGS OR INCOME EXAMPLES, ARE ONLY ESTIMATES OF WHAT WE THINK YOU COULD EARN.”

“ANY AND ALL CLAIMS OR REPRESENTATIONS, AS TO INCOME EARNINGS … ARE NOT TO BE CONSIDERED AS AVERAGE EARNINGS. TESTIMONIALS ARE NOT REPRESENTATIVE.”

And our favorite part …

“WE DO NOT GUARANTEE OR IMPLY THAT YOU WILL … GET RICH, THAT YOU WILL DO AS WELL, OR MAKE ANY MONEY AT ALL. THERE IS NO ASSURANCE YOU'LL DO AS WELL.  IF YOU RELY UPON OUR FIGURES; YOU MUST ACCEPT THE RISK OF NOT DOING AS WELL.”

So they make a claim and then they disclaim their claim!
When you see this, exclaim your skepticism!

We’re NOT (sorry, we got used to seeing ALL CAPS) saying this particular example is a scam, but you would definitely want more information before proceeding.

The thing about earnings claims, at least here in the U.S., is they are required by law to disclose both the number of people and the percentage of people who are earning any amount they quote you.

So don’t be afraid to ask for documented proof of any claim. Then check out our article that describes 403 your next steps are when investigating a business opportunity].

 

Related posts

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129]  

(Image from eggheadmarketing.com)

BIGG Success Logo boxed

I Want to Start a Home-Based Business. How Do I Make Sure It’s Legitimate?

With tough times, people are looking for ways to either save a little or make a little more money. We’ve been getting more questions about part-time and/or home-based business opportunities. Specifically, we’re being asked how to tell if they’re legitimate.

One of the first things to look at is what they’re promising you. Specifically …

Do they make earnings claims?

george "Many offers will tout how much you can make. Legitimate operators will do one of two things: they won’t make any claim at all, or … they will tell you both the number and percentage of people who actually earn what they’re claiming. In my experience, they’re more likely to not make any claim at all."

Some real world examples

marylynn "I did a search for “home based business opportunities.” I saw six on my screen without scrolling down. Of those six, five made an earnings claim. I saw claims like “$250 thousand or more at home”, “$500 to $8,000 per month”, and $30 to $150 thousand in 12 months”. Then I looked at the most regulated business opportunities – franchises. I typed in “franchise opportunities”. One out of the four franchise opportunities made an earnings claim and it was also one of the home-based business opportunities!"

biz_ad

We’re not saying that being a franchise automatically makes it a legitimate opportunity. Nor are we saying that just because it’s not a franchise means it’s a scam. But from these examples, you do see differences in behaviors of companies that are more regulated and those that are not.

Do they stand behind their own claims?

marylynn "I went to the site of one of the home-based business opportunities. This was the one that claimed you could make $250 thousand. I scrolled way, way, down to the bottom of the page and clicked on the tiny, little link that said 'Earnings Disclaimer'."

george "Mary-Lynn printed it out. It was in ALL CAPS. Unlike the small font used for the Earnings Disclaimer, this was in 13.5 point type. They’re covering their you-know-what."

Here are some highlights …

“ANY EARNINGS OR INCOME STATEMENTS,  OR EARNINGS OR INCOME EXAMPLES, ARE ONLY ESTIMATES OF WHAT WE THINK YOU COULD EARN.”

“ANY AND ALL CLAIMS OR REPRESENTATIONS, AS TO INCOME EARNINGS … ARE NOT TO BE CONSIDERED AS AVERAGE EARNINGS. TESTIMONIALS ARE NOT REPRESENTATIVE.”

And our favorite part …

“WE DO NOT GUARANTEE OR IMPLY THAT YOU WILL … GET RICH, THAT YOU WILL DO AS WELL, OR MAKE ANY MONEY AT ALL. THERE IS NO ASSURANCE YOU'LL DO AS WELL.  IF YOU RELY UPON OUR FIGURES; YOU MUST ACCEPT THE RISK OF NOT DOING AS WELL.”

So they make a claim and then they disclaim their claim!
When you see this, exclaim your skepticism!

We’re NOT (sorry, we got used to seeing ALL CAPS) saying this particular example is a scam, but you would definitely want more information before proceeding.

The thing about earnings claims, at least here in the U.S., is they are required by law to disclose both the number of people and the percentage of people who are earning any amount they quote you.

So don’t be afraid to ask for documented proof of any claim. Then check out our article that describes 403 your next steps are when investigating a business opportunity].

 

Related posts

74]

129]  

(Image from eggheadmarketing.com)

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You've Heard of the Purple Cow, but Have You Seen The Purple Tree?

One of the most frequent questions we get is how we come up with show topics. So we thought we’d give you a peak behind the curtain and show you how we arrived at today’s show idea.

We were eating!

That’s why today’s show topic is really … I can’t believe I ate that whole thing! Plop … plop … fizz … fizz!

Mary-Lynn recalled …
We were at a family diner. I started reminiscing about when I was a kid. There was this restaurant that we would go to when we went to visit my grandma. It was called the Hen House. The outside looked like a big red barn. The inside had a country décor and a fun little gift shop that my sister and I would always visit after eating. They had games and books and candy …

George added …
We’re showing our roots here. For those of you who aren’t familiar with it (which is likely most of you), the Hen House was a Midwestern chain. Sort of a smaller version of Cracker Barrel.

I have a book by William Dooner, the guy who started the Hen House chain. And to me, the most memorable thing from his book is when he talks about the purple tree in the forest.

Hence the subject of today’s show!

The Purple Tree

Dooner says to picture yourself walking through a lush green forest. In the middle of it, you come upon a tree that is painted purple. You keep walking, but you can’t get that purple tree out of your mind. Most likely, your impression is negative … because it doesn’t fit. Why someone would paint that tree that color?

Mary-Lynn …
When I heard this story, I wondered if this is where Seth Godin got his idea for The Purple Cow. Because I’d never heard this purple tree story before, but I’d definitely heard of the purple cow.

We can’t speak to Seth Godin’s inspiration, but they are different concepts. William Dooner said to look for something that stands out because it doesn’t fit. It probably leaves a negative impression. Seth Godin encouraged us to purposefully not fit in so that we stand out. By doing that, we make a positive impression.  

In either case, purple tree or purple cow, you remember it.

So, as it applies to real estate, the purple tree in the forest means properties that may be run-down, out-of-the-way, unused, underused … that sort of thing. What Dooner did with the Hen House chain is a perfect example (see, we’re about to make it all fit … you were starting to doubt us, weren’t you?).

The $10 million purple tree

He saw this vacant land next to gas stations along the interstate. It was ugly, smelly, littered with junk, no landscaping. A purple tree. 

This land had never been used commercially. At that point in time, there often wasn’t any place to eat when you stopped to fill up with gas. So Dooner had a bigg idea – he invested $15 thousand to start a restaurant chain on that unwanted and unused land. He later sold that chain for $10 million!

Beyond real estate

We highly recommend Dooner’s book. It’s called How to Go from Rags to Riches in Real Estate. It’s a must read if you’re interested in real estate investing, but this purple tree concept goes beyond that.

Think about customers nobody wants to serve, employees nobody wants to hire, jobs nobody wants to do. Maybe one of those is your purple tree! So look around today … where do you see purple trees?

 

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(Image by Mailjozo)