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Insist on a Weekly Report Before You List Your House with a Realtor

By Bigg Success Staff
04-07-08

Life Changes

phone_call 

You’ve listed your house for sale with a realtor. Days, even weeks, have gone by with no apparent interest in your house. You start to get anxious. What’s going on?

So you call your realtor. He or she tells you what’s being done to market your house. You discuss some alternatives. You hang up your phone and you feel better.

But in a few days, you still don’t see any potential buyers so you call again. Is your realtor doing anything? So you call your realtor again. And once again, after talking with him or her, you feel better about what’s being done to move your house.

Then a few days later … well, you get the picture!

There’s a better way – insist on a weekly report before you list your property with your realtor.

4 Pointers for the Report

Short

You don’t need a detailed written report from your realtor. After all, you want him or her focusing on finding buyers, not talking to you! However, your realtor should be able to get you up-to-speed on what’s going on in a few minutes.

Form
Agree to how the report will be delivered. It can be a phone call or an e-mail. See what your realtor prefers. If it’s a phone call, take notes and e-mail them to your realtor for review to make sure you accurately understood what was said.

Activities
You want to know what’s been done to market your product. Get a feeling for the number of times your house has been shown, any comments that were made, and any suggestions your realtor may have now.

Alternatives
Your contact with your realtor should conclude by discussing your alternatives. We’ll discuss this more in our next article on selling your house.

Getting a weekly report from your realtor serves two purposes:

  • It keeps your realtor accountable
  • It keeps you from bugging them too much!

You’ll feel less stress if you communicate regularly with your realtor. You may also be able to make some adjustments as new information becomes available.

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Hear today's lesson and laugh on The Bigg Success Show.

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Effective Communication Across Department Lines

Communicating is easy, right? The person doing the talking thinks it is! They state their message. Done! The problem is on the other side … how is that message interpreted?

This is especially true when communicating across departments. People with differences – in skill sets, backgrounds, education, and vocabulary – often have difficulty understanding each other.

The book, The Geek Gap, provides a great example. It illustrates the differences between techies (geeks as the authors say) and managers (suits to use the authors’ term).

Knowing how to close the gap is a critical skill for your company’s sake, but also for your own professional advantage. So how do you do it?

First, seek to understand.
We’re borrowing this term from Stephen Covey’s great book,  The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. Different departments tend to attract different personalities.
Think about your stereotypical geek. They like to solve problems, to fix things. They’re intelligent, but often introverted. They like to work on projects. They’re detail-oriented.

Now think about your stereotypical manager. They rely on their ability to influence people. They’re also intelligent, but more likely extroverted. They bring projects in for others to do. They’re bigg picture people.

Obviously, we are grossly oversimplifying here. And we’re purposefully stereotyping to make a point. We can all think of all kinds of people who don’t fit these traits.

But let’s continue stereotyping to keep making the point!

Geeks see technology as an end unto itself. Suits see technology as a tool to accomplish their goals. Geeks are the craftsmen, suits are managers.

To geeks, the goal is to build that perfect product or system that functions just the way it was designed. To management, the purpose of that perfect product or system is solely to meet larger business objectives.

Each side needs to learn to respect the point-of-view of the other. Suits respecting the craftsmanship and geeks seeing how their work contributes to the mission of the organization.

Second, come to value each other.

These diverse points-of-view strengthen the organization. If we’re both exactly alike, one of us isn’t needed!

The craftsman won’t quit until the end product is virtually perfect. There’s a pride of workmanship. The joy is in the creation. It’s about bringing an idea to life.

The manager won’t quit until the goal is met. He or she takes pride in getting things done efficiently and achieving results. The joy is in creating opportunities for people. It’s about moving the organization forward.

Geeks need the suits or they wouldn’t have any projects to work on. Suits need the geeks or the projects wouldn’t get done. It’s the two working together that creates something greater than they could do on their own.

Our bigg quote today is by George Bernard Shaw, who said:

“The single biggest problem in communication
is the illusion that it has taken place.”

Magical things happen when you communicate effectively. Learn the tricks of the trade so you can pull the rabbit out of the hat when you need it.   

Next time, we’ll answer a question from a listener who just lost her job unexpectedly. Until then, here’s to your bigg success!

 

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(Image by happyeclair, CC 2.0)

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Create a Code of Conduct to Create a Covenant with Your Troops

By Bigg Success Staff
03-11-08

Leadership Skills

people 

As a leader, you have to establish the ground rules for your troops. Your rules, also known as your policies, define the code of conduct. If done correctly, they are not a negative. They are a covenant between you and your troops as well as between your troops themselves.

What they are

The problem is that, much of the time, ground rules are written as negatives. So your people view them as negatives. It doesn’t need to be that way. They simply establish how all of you must proceed to get where you want to go.

Your ground rules define how your people work with people – each other, you, your customers, your vendors, your community, and more. They are designed to minimize individual behavior that harms the group effort. Period. When all of your troops understand that, they will buy in to the rules.

Your ground rules should answer these questions:

  • How do things work under your leadership?
  • What behavior is acceptable and unacceptable?
  • What are the consequences for inappropriate behavior?
  • What resources are available to members of our team?
  • What are the team rewards for achieving victory?


Why you need them

Your attorney will tell you that you need ground rules to protect yourself from liability. That’s true – and you should get your attorney’s advice throughout this process. However, there are even more important reasons to establish the ground rules.

Your ground rules help new troops get acquainted with your culture. They will be able to get “up to speed” more quickly when you clearly define the expected behaviors.

They also establish that you are trying to be fair to everybody. There’s a set of rules to which you refer when a certain behavior is called into question. It’s not a who’s who where favorites get treated one way and everybody else gets treated differently.

Occasionally, you will override the rules because of a specific situation. After all, your troops are humans, not machines. You’ll use your best judgment to determine when the good of the group calls for bending the rules a little. If done correctly, your troops will respect you for that.

Keep it simple
Make sure your rules aren’t written in legalese. They should be easily understood by all your troops. If it takes a lawyer to interpret them, rework them.

How extensive your rules need to be depends in large part on the emotional maturity of the people you lead. In general, the more mature your people are, the fewer rules you need. And the fewer rules you can get away with, the better.

Resist the 1% rule

Novice leaders often create rules in response to specific acts by a minority of people (1%) that are infrequently repeated. Then, the overwhelming majority (99%) of their troops has to live with them. This is a primary reason why people resist rules.

For example, picture a leader who says that there is a new dress code because one person out of a hundred is wearing inappropriate clothing to work. Instead of dealing with that one employee, this leader chooses to create a rule for all of the employees.

These leaders see it as an easy solution – it’s easier to write a policy than deal with an individual employee. They may have the time or they may not like confrontation. Whatever the reason, it may be easier in the short run, but it is almost certain to create even bigger problems in the long run when dealt with in this way.

The code of conduct you establish for your troops is essential to insure you reach your goal. You want rules that your people buy in to so you create a covenant between yourselves that insure a smoother path to victory.

Hear today's lesson and laugh on The Bigg Success Show. 

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7 Things You Must Learn In College That College Won't Teach You

diploma 

Some things are teachable; others have to be learned. Today, we’ll discuss things you have to learn on your own. Hopefully, you’ll do it while you’re still in college! If you’re already out, check this list to see how you’re doing!

#1 – Learn how YOU learn.
Do you learn best by reading? Listening? Watching? Or some combination? You’ll save a lot of time, money, and frustration later if you learn this now.

#2 – Learn HOW to think.
Most students focus on WHAT to think. Get a well-rounded education so you can cut to the essence of any issue. You fully understand a topic when you can debate both sides of an argument equally well.

#3 – Learn self-discipline.
Know how to set goals and schedule yourself to achieve them. Stick to the schedule you’ve set so you can focus on your priorities and balance work with fun.

#4 – Learn how to build YOUR brand.
You are the CEO of most important organization – YOU, Inc. For what will you be famous? What makes you unique? How will you let the world know?

The choices you make are critical. It’s good to be a member of an organization; it’s better to be a leader in it. Choose internships and summer jobs wisely because they reflect on your brand, too.

#5 – Learn how to communicate effectively.

It’s true – you learn a LITTLE bit about this in college. But how you communicate reflects on your brand. For example, if your written work is full of typographical errors and grammatical mistakes, the reader may assume that you’re sloppy or apathetic. Also understand that HOW you say something is just as important as WHAT you say.

#6 – Learn how to build your network.
Take every opportunity to reach out to people with common interests. It’s amazing how few students get to know their professors. They are great mentors even after you’re done with college!

It’s important to 61 cultivate relationships]. Take an interest in them. For your network to work when you desperately need it, you’ll need 303 established relationships].

There are no six steps to Kevin Bacon when it comes to networking. You need to get one step removed from the person you need to contact. If you know me, and I know somebody, you have a good chance with that somebody.

#7 – Learn how to find your initial vision.
Your vision consists of your passion, your values, your competencies, and the environment you face. Here are some great resources to help you:

  • 11 Find your passion by visualizing your future]
  • 62 Find your purpose]
  • 123 Learn how to discover your strengths and weaknesses]
  • 127 Understand the opportunities and threats in your chosen career]

Your vision will probably change over time. However, developing the skills to discover it and work toward it are essential to your bigg success.

Did you dig this article? Then Digg it!

Just click on the Share This button below!

Our bigg quote today comes from the great Ralph Waldo Emerson, who said,

“The things taught in schools and colleges are
not an education, but the means to an education.”

Education is a life-long adventure to discover yourself and uncover your full potential.

As he moves on from the game he loves, superstar quarterback Brett Favre taught us a lesson on peak performance. We’ll discuss it in our next blog.

Brett’s moving on to the perfect job. One with two vacations a year … six months each!

Until next time, here’s to your bigg success! 

 

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BIGG Success Logo boxed

7 Things You Must Learn In College That College Won’t Teach You

diploma 

Some things are teachable; others have to be learned. Today, we’ll discuss things you have to learn on your own. Hopefully, you’ll do it while you’re still in college! If you’re already out, check this list to see how you’re doing!

#1 – Learn how YOU learn.
Do you learn best by reading? Listening? Watching? Or some combination? You’ll save a lot of time, money, and frustration later if you learn this now.

#2 – Learn HOW to think.
Most students focus on WHAT to think. Get a well-rounded education so you can cut to the essence of any issue. You fully understand a topic when you can debate both sides of an argument equally well.

#3 – Learn self-discipline.
Know how to set goals and schedule yourself to achieve them. Stick to the schedule you’ve set so you can focus on your priorities and balance work with fun.

#4 – Learn how to build YOUR brand.
You are the CEO of most important organization – YOU, Inc. For what will you be famous? What makes you unique? How will you let the world know?

The choices you make are critical. It’s good to be a member of an organization; it’s better to be a leader in it. Choose internships and summer jobs wisely because they reflect on your brand, too.

#5 – Learn how to communicate effectively.

It’s true – you learn a LITTLE bit about this in college. But how you communicate reflects on your brand. For example, if your written work is full of typographical errors and grammatical mistakes, the reader may assume that you’re sloppy or apathetic. Also understand that HOW you say something is just as important as WHAT you say.

#6 – Learn how to build your network.
Take every opportunity to reach out to people with common interests. It’s amazing how few students get to know their professors. They are great mentors even after you’re done with college!

It’s important to 61 cultivate relationships]. Take an interest in them. For your network to work when you desperately need it, you’ll need 303 established relationships].

There are no six steps to Kevin Bacon when it comes to networking. You need to get one step removed from the person you need to contact. If you know me, and I know somebody, you have a good chance with that somebody.

#7 – Learn how to find your initial vision.
Your vision consists of your passion, your values, your competencies, and the environment you face. Here are some great resources to help you:

  • 11 Find your passion by visualizing your future]
  • 62 Find your purpose]
  • 123 Learn how to discover your strengths and weaknesses]
  • 127 Understand the opportunities and threats in your chosen career]

Your vision will probably change over time. However, developing the skills to discover it and work toward it are essential to your bigg success.

Did you dig this article? Then Digg it!

Just click on the Share This button below!

Our bigg quote today comes from the great Ralph Waldo Emerson, who said,

“The things taught in schools and colleges are
not an education, but the means to an education.”

Education is a life-long adventure to discover yourself and uncover your full potential.

As he moves on from the game he loves, superstar quarterback Brett Favre taught us a lesson on peak performance. We’ll discuss it in our next blog.

Brett’s moving on to the perfect job. One with two vacations a year … six months each!

Until next time, here’s to your bigg success! 

 

Related posts

222]

173]

190]

How To Get Promoted To Senior Management

121]

What Makes You Tick?

21]

89]

110]

(Image by gadgetdude,CC 2.0)

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