Posts

BIGG Success Logo boxed

How to Get Noticed in Job Market 2.0

Today on The Bigg Success Show, we welcomed Phil Rosenberg. Phil is the founder of reCareered, a career coaching service that helps job searchers get past the biggest challenge in today’s competitive jobs market – to get noticed.

 

Phil, what does reCareered mean?

 

 

It means someone who is seeking a job change, or trying to revitalize their career, or someone who is between jobs and wants help with how the job markets have changed in the last eight years or so.

 

How has the job market changed?

 

 

Eight years ago, the majority of resumes were delivered on paper. Around 2000, it changed to where most resumes were delivered digitally.

 

And how does that change the resume itself?

 

 

It changes it completely. The paper-based resume had to be static. The only way to customize it was by a cover letter. A digital resume can be searched. It also increased the number of resumes that went into most companies, by as many as ten-fold.

 

We always hear about search engine optimization and how you want to rank at the tops of the pages for Google. But apparently you can do the same for your resume … it can be optimized?

 

You bet, and it’s especially critical in today’s world. Most major employers get thousands of resumes for each job, but they only staff to look at twenty to thirty. That’s two to three percent. So your goal, in submitting your resume today, is getting to the top two or three percent. Through resume search optimization, you can manage that process rather than have it be random. My strategy with my clients is to make a resume a single-use document – to have it infinitely customizable so that you’re gaming the search engine and forcing it higher up the search page.

 

How do we make a good impression right upfront?

 

 

There’s been research from the University of Toledo and Stanford University that states that interview decisions are made within the first two to thirty seconds. That blew me away. The rest of the interview is just somebody justifying their initial decision. So it’s a “gut feel” decision that may occur even before you shake hands. It’s all about preparation. Learn about your client – how they communicate (verbally and non-verbally), how they dress, how they look. If you want a job, go to a place that’s close to their office and sit there during lunch. Talk to people from that company who are getting lunch there. On a Friday night, go to Happy Hour at a bar close to their office and talk to people from that company. When you talk to them, watch their body movements. What’s the tone they use? What’s the speed they use to talk? You can also do that with their written communication – their web site, annual reports, press releases. The key to all this is communicating to your audience that it seems like you already work there.

 

It reminds me of the book, Guerilla Selling. It’s all about learning about your customer, in that case, but in the case the employer you’re going after – getting as much information as you can, wherever you can. It’s amazing how much information you can gather.

 

Sure. That’s also an effective way to use LinkedIn, Facebook or your own personal network. Chances are you have contacts within that company. A lot of people only use those contacts to see what jobs are available and to ask them to pass their resume along. They leave out some of the greatest uses of a network – talking to people within an organization to find out what an organization is like and what the communication style is like. Listening for how they’re answering questions rather than just what they’re saying.

 

This is fantastic advice because you do want to fit in. It’s all about mimicking. When you’re at an interview, should you sit up straight and lean forward or should you try to have your body language be similar to the body language of the interviewer? From what I’ve read, you should try to mimic that person.

 

That’s exactly what you’re doing – it’s called mirroring. You’re trying to show that you fit in. You speak the same language. You’re really trying to act like you already work at the company. It takes a ton of preparation. A lot of people aren’t willing to put that preparation in, but the people who do get a huge, almost an unfair, advantage.

Phil's links

You can get free daily job tips from Phil at his blog or visit his main site, reCareered, the place for resume search optimization and job search 2.0. 

 

BIGG Success Logo boxed

I Want to Start a Home-Based Business. How Do I Make Sure It's Legitimate?

With tough times, people are looking for ways to either save a little or make a little more money. We’ve been getting more questions about part-time and/or home-based business opportunities. Specifically, we’re being asked how to tell if they’re legitimate.

One of the first things to look at is what they’re promising you. Specifically …

Do they make earnings claims?

george "Many offers will tout how much you can make. Legitimate operators will do one of two things: they won’t make any claim at all, or … they will tell you both the number and percentage of people who actually earn what they’re claiming. In my experience, they’re more likely to not make any claim at all."

Some real world examples

marylynn "I did a search for “home based business opportunities.” I saw six on my screen without scrolling down. Of those six, five made an earnings claim. I saw claims like “$250 thousand or more at home”, “$500 to $8,000 per month”, and $30 to $150 thousand in 12 months”. Then I looked at the most regulated business opportunities – franchises. I typed in “franchise opportunities”. One out of the four franchise opportunities made an earnings claim and it was also one of the home-based business opportunities!"

biz_ad

We’re not saying that being a franchise automatically makes it a legitimate opportunity. Nor are we saying that just because it’s not a franchise means it’s a scam. But from these examples, you do see differences in behaviors of companies that are more regulated and those that are not.

Do they stand behind their own claims?

marylynn "I went to the site of one of the home-based business opportunities. This was the one that claimed you could make $250 thousand. I scrolled way, way, down to the bottom of the page and clicked on the tiny, little link that said 'Earnings Disclaimer'."

george "Mary-Lynn printed it out. It was in ALL CAPS. Unlike the small font used for the Earnings Disclaimer, this was in 13.5 point type. They’re covering their you-know-what."

Here are some highlights …

“ANY EARNINGS OR INCOME STATEMENTS,  OR EARNINGS OR INCOME EXAMPLES, ARE ONLY ESTIMATES OF WHAT WE THINK YOU COULD EARN.”

“ANY AND ALL CLAIMS OR REPRESENTATIONS, AS TO INCOME EARNINGS … ARE NOT TO BE CONSIDERED AS AVERAGE EARNINGS. TESTIMONIALS ARE NOT REPRESENTATIVE.”

And our favorite part …

“WE DO NOT GUARANTEE OR IMPLY THAT YOU WILL … GET RICH, THAT YOU WILL DO AS WELL, OR MAKE ANY MONEY AT ALL. THERE IS NO ASSURANCE YOU'LL DO AS WELL.  IF YOU RELY UPON OUR FIGURES; YOU MUST ACCEPT THE RISK OF NOT DOING AS WELL.”

So they make a claim and then they disclaim their claim!
When you see this, exclaim your skepticism!

We’re NOT (sorry, we got used to seeing ALL CAPS) saying this particular example is a scam, but you would definitely want more information before proceeding.

The thing about earnings claims, at least here in the U.S., is they are required by law to disclose both the number of people and the percentage of people who are earning any amount they quote you.

So don’t be afraid to ask for documented proof of any claim. Then check out our article that describes 403 your next steps are when investigating a business opportunity].

 

Related posts

74]

129]  

(Image from eggheadmarketing.com)

BIGG Success Logo boxed

I Want to Start a Home-Based Business. How Do I Make Sure It’s Legitimate?

With tough times, people are looking for ways to either save a little or make a little more money. We’ve been getting more questions about part-time and/or home-based business opportunities. Specifically, we’re being asked how to tell if they’re legitimate.

One of the first things to look at is what they’re promising you. Specifically …

Do they make earnings claims?

george "Many offers will tout how much you can make. Legitimate operators will do one of two things: they won’t make any claim at all, or … they will tell you both the number and percentage of people who actually earn what they’re claiming. In my experience, they’re more likely to not make any claim at all."

Some real world examples

marylynn "I did a search for “home based business opportunities.” I saw six on my screen without scrolling down. Of those six, five made an earnings claim. I saw claims like “$250 thousand or more at home”, “$500 to $8,000 per month”, and $30 to $150 thousand in 12 months”. Then I looked at the most regulated business opportunities – franchises. I typed in “franchise opportunities”. One out of the four franchise opportunities made an earnings claim and it was also one of the home-based business opportunities!"

biz_ad

We’re not saying that being a franchise automatically makes it a legitimate opportunity. Nor are we saying that just because it’s not a franchise means it’s a scam. But from these examples, you do see differences in behaviors of companies that are more regulated and those that are not.

Do they stand behind their own claims?

marylynn "I went to the site of one of the home-based business opportunities. This was the one that claimed you could make $250 thousand. I scrolled way, way, down to the bottom of the page and clicked on the tiny, little link that said 'Earnings Disclaimer'."

george "Mary-Lynn printed it out. It was in ALL CAPS. Unlike the small font used for the Earnings Disclaimer, this was in 13.5 point type. They’re covering their you-know-what."

Here are some highlights …

“ANY EARNINGS OR INCOME STATEMENTS,  OR EARNINGS OR INCOME EXAMPLES, ARE ONLY ESTIMATES OF WHAT WE THINK YOU COULD EARN.”

“ANY AND ALL CLAIMS OR REPRESENTATIONS, AS TO INCOME EARNINGS … ARE NOT TO BE CONSIDERED AS AVERAGE EARNINGS. TESTIMONIALS ARE NOT REPRESENTATIVE.”

And our favorite part …

“WE DO NOT GUARANTEE OR IMPLY THAT YOU WILL … GET RICH, THAT YOU WILL DO AS WELL, OR MAKE ANY MONEY AT ALL. THERE IS NO ASSURANCE YOU'LL DO AS WELL.  IF YOU RELY UPON OUR FIGURES; YOU MUST ACCEPT THE RISK OF NOT DOING AS WELL.”

So they make a claim and then they disclaim their claim!
When you see this, exclaim your skepticism!

We’re NOT (sorry, we got used to seeing ALL CAPS) saying this particular example is a scam, but you would definitely want more information before proceeding.

The thing about earnings claims, at least here in the U.S., is they are required by law to disclose both the number of people and the percentage of people who are earning any amount they quote you.

So don’t be afraid to ask for documented proof of any claim. Then check out our article that describes 403 your next steps are when investigating a business opportunity].

 

Related posts

74]

129]  

(Image from eggheadmarketing.com)

BIGG Success Logo boxed

Ben Franklin Got It Wrong

Change. A word that sparks fear in many people.

We work to get to that comfortable spot, and we want to stay there.

“Nothing is certain except death and taxes.”
Ben Franklin

We think he got it wrong, not in the message, but in the semantics. We think he should have explicitly included change as something that is certain, rather than making it implicit in his quote.  


Will you lead or follow?

Even when it’s change that we’re creating ourselves, it can be scary. But it’s especially frightening when it’s a surprise.

For example, picture Jane telling her boss that she’s accepted a new position. She’s going to experience change. But isn’t that more comfortable than Jane’s boss telling her that her job is being eliminated?

It’s better to be a leader of change than a follower.

Who’s in control?
However, you can’t always control change. What you can control all the time is how you choose to respond to it.

You can also try to anticipate it. For example, as technology continues to develop, change is occurring more and more rapidly. Isn’t it safe to assume that this will continue?

So you have a choice to make. You either develop the skills to anticipate change so you get ahead of it or you just respond to it, after the pain becomes too great to do anything else.

Bigg action item – Separate the change into fads and trends
There are fads and there are trends. Fads come and go, so don’t worry about them. Trends are long-term. Get on board with them.

Divide a sheet into two columns – one called “Fads” and the other called “Trends”.  In your chosen career, think about the things affecting your industry. Now start putting those changes into the appropriate column.

What will affect your future income? Something will – for good or for bad!

Is it a short-term phenomenon? Or is it likely to continue? You can position yourself properly by seeing the change coming.

What opportunities will be created? What skills will be important? Do you have them? Can you get them?

Develop a plan for what you need to do to position yourself to take advantage of the trends.

Where do I get this information?

We’ll look at two examples. Search for the name of your industry followed by the word “association”. For example, “beauty salon association” yielded a half-dozen or so associations in Google.

You can also subscribe to magazines for your industry, or just about any industry you’re interested in following. They’re often free, supported by the advertisers. Amazon has an excellent resource that lists magazines by industry. It’s an extensive list!

So there are a number of ways to get the information you need so you can embrace change rather than begrudge it.

 

Related posts

489]

109]  

(Image by bob923)