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Is Work Death

questionsWe have some questions about work – life balance. It sounds so nice at first. But when you really think about it, what exactly does it mean?

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Let’s start with the phrase itself. Work – life balance. It implies that work isn’t a part of life, doesn’t it?

So is work death?

And how do you figure out this whole balance thing. It seems like you would have to tightly define work and life.

So what is work?

For example, does work mean the time you spend making money? If so, a stay-at-home mom or dad doesn’t work! Yet we all know how hard their job can be.

What about other unpaid work? Are the chores you do at home part of work or part of life?

Here’s another scenario: Imagine you want to go on a once-in-a-lifetime trip. So you take a temporary part-time job to pay for that trip. Is that work or is it part of life since you’re really only taking on the part-time endeavor to pay for something fun?

What if you turn your hobby into a part-time business? You think it’s great; instead of having to pay to do something you enjoy, you get paid to do it. Is that work or life?

Would it make any difference if that part-time business turned into a full-time opportunity? Would you be working at all or would your whole life just be … well, life.

And what is life?

Assuming you work in an office, do you consider the time you spend commuting work or life? Let’s assume that you consider it work. What if you choose to live some distance away from work? That’s definitely a life choice. So is the extra time counted as life or is it still work?

Does sleep count as life? It’s essential for life, but how productive are you at work after a sleepless night?

Even if you don’t get the sleep that’s recommended, it’s still a significant chunk of your day. So when you think about balance, do you just exclude sleep altogether?

What is balance?

Doesn’t balance imply an equal split between work and life? Is that what work – life balance really means? Are you supposed to spend half your time living and half dying (if work is death)?

If it’s not a 50 / 50 split, how can we call it balance? How many people ever achieve an even share of each? Is that even desirable?

Okay, we hear it … you want to know our point. Well, we have three of them:

No lines in the sand

The first one is that work – life balance is not only an outdated concept, we’re not sure it was a great concept in the first place!

Bigg goal-getters don’t draw a line in the sand. Work and life are integrated. They always have been. They always should be.

Work is a part of life. Life is a part of work. It’s best to accept that reality and find ways to make them work (or live) seamlessly together.

It’s a custom blend

Bigg success is life on your own terms. You decide the right mix of personal and professional. It’s your custom blend.

If you’re perfectly happy spending eighty percent of your time on personal activities, have at it. If you love your work and want to spend eighty percent of your time doing it, more power to you.

We’ll just share one caveat about working too much. Research has shown that experts can get too close to their subject and lose some of their creativity. You may not be well-rounded, but at least be a little rounded!

We’re preaching to ourselves in that last paragraph … we needed the reminder!

Look for synergy

Finally, don’t think zero-sum. Don’t accept that there has to be tradeoffs. Work doesn’t have to end so life can begin and vice versa.

If you think there has to tradeoffs, then you’re right. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. However, if you think it’s possible (better yet, probable) that you can find a solution that doesn’t require a trade-off, you’ll be more likely to try one.

That’s the bigg idea behind bigg success. There is synergy in the world. Strive to find ways to get your personal and professional lives working for each other instead of against each other. That’s bigg success!

What works for you?

We’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below, call us at 888.455.BIGG (2444) or e-mail us at bigginfo@biggsuccess.com.

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Subscribe to the Bigg Success Weekly – it’s FREE!

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Thanks so much for reading our little rant today.

Please join us next time when we begin a series of five posts on freedom. Until then, here’s to your bigg success!

Subscribe to The Bigg Success Show in iTunes. 

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Direct link to The Bigg Success Show audio file:
http://media.libsyn.com/media/biggsuccess/00425-062609.mp3

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(Image in today's post by svilen001)

Want to be a Millionaire? Here’s How to Think Like One

saleCNN Money recently asked forty people for the best advice they ever got about money. One of the people featured is Bill Nygren, the great manager of the Oakmark Select Fund.

He refers to an episode of the Johnny Carson show, where Johnny asked financial guru Andrew Tobias how someone with only $1,000 should invest it. Andrew Tobias said they should buy non-perishable items.

The crowd got quite a kick out of that answer!

Here was this great financial mind suggesting that people, with only a small amount of money, buy common, every day items instead of investing it.

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——

Saving money beats making money

There’s incredible wisdom in his answer. After all, whether we save money or invest it, we end up with more money. In fact, we end up with more, by saving it, because we don’t pay taxes on what we save; we only pay taxes on what we earn.

So if we save $100, we’ll be ahead by $100. If we earn $100 and we’re in the 25% tax bracket, we’ll only be ahead by $75.

Trading time for money

We all face tradeoffs. One of those is saving money by spending time or vice versa. For example, we often eat out to save time. But eating out costs more money than buying the groceries and cooking for ourselves.

Thinking like an investor, we have to ask ourselves how we’re spending that time. If it’s not productive – if it’s not saving us more money or making us more money – we might as well spend that time dining in.

Of course, it’s not just about money. We do understand quality of life! We just had to throw this in here to let you know we are human!

Weighing now vs. later

Another trade-off we have to consider is now vs. later. If we spend money today, we won’t have it tomorrow. But instead of spending it today, we could invest it. If we do that, we’ll have more money tomorrow (the original money plus whatever we earn on our investment).

Every outlay is an investment

Taking the advice Tobias gave, if I can save enough on the non-perishables I buy, it may be worth it to buy them now so I don’t have to pay more tomorrow. It’s just like investing the money now to have a greater amount later.

Millionaires get this concept

In his great book, The Millionaire Mind, Thomas Stanley talks about how millionaires spend their money. Of course, they invest. But millionaires are also very frugal.  Some examples that Stanley points out are:

  • They tend to buy used cars. New cars depreciate too quickly for millionaires.
  • They buy couture clothes, but usually buy them second-hand. They want the quality, but know they will pay much less this way.
  • In what you might think is a contradiction to these previous two, they buy high quality furniture, which tend to go up in value.

So you know you’re thinking like a millionaire when you’re looking at every dollar you spend as an investment. Are you getting the return you want?
 

Get the tips and tools you need to be a BIGG success.
Subscribe to the Bigg Success Weekly – it’s FREE!

Next time, we’ll talk about getting ahead by getting out. Until then, here’s to your bigg success!

Subscribe to The Bigg Success Show in iTunes. 

Subscribe to the Bigg Success feed.

Related posts

Print Your Own Money Legally

63 Moves to Stop Living from Paycheck to Paycheck

Getting Aggressively Passive: Creating A Passive Income That Sets You Free

(Image by nazreth)

Want to be a Millionaire? Here's How to Think Like One

saleCNN Money recently asked forty people for the best advice they ever got about money. One of the people featured is Bill Nygren, the great manager of the Oakmark Select Fund.

He refers to an episode of the Johnny Carson show, where Johnny asked financial guru Andrew Tobias how someone with only $1,000 should invest it. Andrew Tobias said they should buy non-perishable items.

The crowd got quite a kick out of that answer!

Here was this great financial mind suggesting that people, with only a small amount of money, buy common, every day items instead of investing it.

——

——

Saving money beats making money

There’s incredible wisdom in his answer. After all, whether we save money or invest it, we end up with more money. In fact, we end up with more, by saving it, because we don’t pay taxes on what we save; we only pay taxes on what we earn.

So if we save $100, we’ll be ahead by $100. If we earn $100 and we’re in the 25% tax bracket, we’ll only be ahead by $75.

Trading time for money

We all face tradeoffs. One of those is saving money by spending time or vice versa. For example, we often eat out to save time. But eating out costs more money than buying the groceries and cooking for ourselves.

Thinking like an investor, we have to ask ourselves how we’re spending that time. If it’s not productive – if it’s not saving us more money or making us more money – we might as well spend that time dining in.

Of course, it’s not just about money. We do understand quality of life! We just had to throw this in here to let you know we are human!

Weighing now vs. later

Another trade-off we have to consider is now vs. later. If we spend money today, we won’t have it tomorrow. But instead of spending it today, we could invest it. If we do that, we’ll have more money tomorrow (the original money plus whatever we earn on our investment).

Every outlay is an investment

Taking the advice Tobias gave, if I can save enough on the non-perishables I buy, it may be worth it to buy them now so I don’t have to pay more tomorrow. It’s just like investing the money now to have a greater amount later.

Millionaires get this concept

In his great book, The Millionaire Mind, Thomas Stanley talks about how millionaires spend their money. Of course, they invest. But millionaires are also very frugal.  Some examples that Stanley points out are:

  • They tend to buy used cars. New cars depreciate too quickly for millionaires.
  • They buy couture clothes, but usually buy them second-hand. They want the quality, but know they will pay much less this way.
  • In what you might think is a contradiction to these previous two, they buy high quality furniture, which tend to go up in value.

So you know you’re thinking like a millionaire when you’re looking at every dollar you spend as an investment. Are you getting the return you want?
 

Get the tips and tools you need to be a BIGG success.
Subscribe to the Bigg Success Weekly – it’s FREE!

Next time, we’ll talk about getting ahead by getting out. Until then, here’s to your bigg success!

Subscribe to The Bigg Success Show in iTunes. 

Subscribe to the Bigg Success feed.

Related posts

Print Your Own Money Legally

63 Moves to Stop Living from Paycheck to Paycheck

Getting Aggressively Passive: Creating A Passive Income That Sets You Free

(Image by nazreth)