Are Twenty Somethings Getting A Bad Rap?

Three managers from three different generations, told us in three separate conversations, about their challenges with twenty somethings. Do young people today want the rewards without the effort?

Here are a few of our many thoughts on this question. First, to those who are a little past your twenties (or still holding on strong to 29 … again):

  • Be careful not to over-generalize.
  • When a lot of people think of baby boomers, they think of hippies. Gen Xers are slackers. Yet these attributes only apply to a small portion of the total population of each of these generations.

    The same is true of twenty somethings. Sure, some think they’re entitled to the best of everything. But many share the same work ethic, the same desire to prove themselves, as their predecessors.

  • Show them how they make a difference.
  • Employees of all generations consistently want two things from work, in addition to making a decent living. First, people want to be recognized for a job well done. Second, people want to feel like they’re part of something bigger.

    A young woman, with tears welling up in her eyes, told us about her first job, as a summer intern for the Chicago Housing Authority. Here’s her story:

    “On my first day of work, I walked into the office and was greeted by the receptionist. She immediately called my supervisor. My supervisor took me back to her office.

    She said, ‘I’m so glad you’re here. Our work is very important. We find homes for people. And I’m so happy that you’re here because we have more people wanting homes than we can handle. With your help, we’ll find homes for more people.’

    I couldn’t wait to get to work every day. Because I knew I was helping people.”

    Go the extra mile – show your people, of all ages, how your organization makes a difference. If you do, you’ll have a group of motivated employees.

Now, for those of you in your twenties:

  • Turn this negative into your positive.
  • This perception is out there … and it’s going to stick, at least for awhile. Use it to your advantage. If you go the extra mile, you’ll stand out from the crowd. Successful people do what unsuccessful people don’t.

    Little things make big differences. For example, get to work fifteen minutes earlier tomorrow. Stay fifteen minutes later. You’ll get noticed! Over time, you’ll be surprised at the difference it makes.

  • Prepare yourself now for the opportunity to come.
  • Opportunity will present itself. The only question is whether or not you’ll be ready. If you can’t or won’t do little things extremely well, you’re won’t get the opportunity to work on big things.

    Napoleon Hill, in his great book, Think and Grow Rich, tells the story of Edwin Barnes. Barnes went to work for Thomas Edison, with the goal of becoming Edison’s partner. Edison invented a product that his sales people said wouldn’t sell. Barnes saw his opportunity – he took the project no one else wanted and became Edison’s partner in the process!

Our quote today is by the great quarterback, Roger Staubach.

“There are no traffic jams along the extra mile.”

Give all you’ve got and you’ll get more than you can imagine.

Tomorrow, we’ll discuss the communication debate – e-mail, phone, or face-to-face – what contact method should you use? Until then, here’s to your big success!

people mingling at a holiday office party

Mingle Bells: Tips For Networking At Your Holiday Party

people mingling at a holiday office party

‘Tis the season for gatherings! It’s a great opportunity to reconnect with people, and make new connections. In today’s show, you’ll learn four tips to mingle and network your way through your holiday parties.

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The Story On Storytelling

Last time, we discussed the single biggest barrier to your success – the fear of failure. We challenged you to cultivate the fear of not trying so you overcome the fear of failure.
Don’t forget to keep visualizing your future!

Today, we want to discuss storytelling – how to tell the right story right. To get the most benefit from this, you really should listen to today’s show. It’s really easy to do. Just click on the “triangle” above.

If you don’t want to do that, you can read it here. If you’re a history buff, we highly recommend the site where we got this story: Boston 1775.

Longfellow’s Dilemma
Do you remember the famous poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow that starts like this:

Listen my children, and you shall hear,
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere.

Of course, the purpose of Revere’s ride was to warn the people of the colonies that the British were coming.

But did you know that Longfellow faced a dilemma after he wrote this poem.  You see, there was a second rider that night. A gentleman by the name of William Dawes. And the Dawes family didn’t take kindly to Longfellow’s failure to mention their ancestor.

So, why did Longfellow single out Revere? We need some background before we can answer that question.

Some time before Longfellow wrote his poem, Revere was asked to record the events of that fateful evening. And Revere delivered exactly what was expected – a riveting account about the start of the American Revolution that historians have used ever since.

So why did Longfellow single out Revere in his famous poem?

Because Paul Revere told a great story!

The two parts to telling the right story right

Stories advance your message by capturing your audience.  So, it follows, good storytelling helps advance your career. 

Telling stories well, though, isn’t always easy.  So here’s the story on storytelling.

Get the right story

  • Your story must relate to your audience and your topic.Your story should naturally lead to or from your topic.
  • Your story should be proportional to your presentation; you can’t spend half of your  presentation telling a story.
  • Your story must ring true, but should describe a situation that is out-of-the-ordinary.
  • Your story should present a problem faced by the main character.
  • Your story should have a happy ending … or at least be uplifting to your audience.

Get the story right

  • Pretend you’re telling your story to your best friend.
  • Tell your story from one character’s point-of-view.
  • Develop the story fully.  You want to paint a picture in the mind of your audience. That’s worth a thousand words, right?
  • Vary your pace with the activity of the story.  Describe a flurry with rapidity and so on. This helps your audience feel the story.
  • Use moments of silence for emphasis.
  • Don’t rush through the punch line.
  • It is okay to embellish, but you should not lie.

Stories connect you with your audience by capturing their attention. Choose the right story and tell it right and you’ll be a hit every time!

Our quote today is by the author, Philip Pullman.

“’Thou shalt not’ is soon forgotten, but ‘Once upon a time’ lasts forever.”

That’s the story on storytelling. Tell the right story right and you’ll live happily ever after.

Next time, we’ll look at the role of role playing.

Until then, here’s to your bigg success!