Posts

bad critique-BIGG Success

How to Handle a Bad Critique

bad critique-BIGG Success

A bad critique can put a BIGG Goal-Getters into a bad mood fast. We are perfectionists at heart. We strive to do our best every day and put thought and heart into the work that we do. It’s personal for us. It’s a reflection of our work ethic.

What’s worse than being told we’ve done something wrong – is being told about it with destructive criticism rather than constructive criticism.

Listen to us share today’s tips on The BIGG Success Show Podcast, and get a bonus tip that’s not here on the blog. Click PLAY.

The Bad Critique

BIGG Goal-Getters agonize over having to critique someone. They write it out, practice saying it out loud, and try not to be too negative while getting a point across. So it stings quite a bit when you aren’t treated in the same manor.

We’ve all experienced the boss who just rips you a new one, or who makes one mistake seem like that’s the scope of your entire work history. It’s easy to feel defeated, and even worry that your standing in the company just got knocked down a few rungs.

The Best Way to React to a Bad Critique

You can’t let a bad critique keep you down. Here are some things you can do in response.

• Don’t respond when you’re upset! You’ll only say things you’ll regret. You’ve never burned bridges so don’t start now.

• If you believe the criticism is wrong, carefully and calmly debate why you think it is.

• Resist the urge to over please your critic. Fix the issue, let the appropriate person know, and move on.

• Don’t let your critic’s voice get into your head. It’ll just make you nervous and more likely to make another mistake.

• Try not to take it personally. You are you. Your work is your work. There is a separation.

• Consider the source. Not everyone cares as much as you to handle things the right way. Realize your critic has a lot to learn.

• Talk to someone you trust. Get out your frustration and say the things to them you’d never say in a professional setting.

Unfortunately, there are people who are put in leadership positions that have no idea how to be a true leader. You can’t control how this person will behave towards you in the future, so focus on what you can control…your reaction. It leads to BIGG Success! How about you? What suggestions do you have to offer about reacting to a bad critique? Leave a comment below.

Direct link to The Bigg Success Show audio file | podcast:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/biggsuccess/00892-022614.mp3

Image from stock.xchng

How to Offer Criticism Without Being Critical

Today’s blog is about an important relationship-building tool. It’s important at work and home. It’s crucial for leaders and first-time managers.

It’s about understanding when to use your “active” voice and when to use your “passive” voice. It may sound simple, but it’s amazing how many times we get it wrong.


Today, we’ll quickly review active and passive voice, and offer some tips on how to use each one effectively.

Active voice
The subject of the sentence appears before the action. Stated more simply, the noun occurs before the verb. The active voice is often more direct and easier to follow.

For example, “You performed exceptionally well on this project.

Passive voice
The action appears in the sentence before the subject, if the subject appears at all. The verb comes first, the noun comes later.

So the example above, spoken in the passive voice would be, “This project was done exceptionally well by you.”

Note that this sentence actually sounds a little strange stated in the passive voice. That’s often the case.

Use the passive voice to offer criticism.
The passive voice has its uses. For example, which of the following two statements would you rather hear?

“You performed below expectations on this project”

“Expectations weren’t met on this project.”

The first example is in the active voice. So the focus is on “you”, not the “project”. The second example does the opposite – using the passive voice, it puts the focus on the project.

The second example sounds better on this go-around, doesn’t it? Can you picture yourself getting defensive with the first sentence? Probably so, because it screams, “You screwed up!”

So when you want to discuss anything negative, use your passive voice. You’ll find that your conversation is much more productive! They won’t feel backed into a corner. They feel more like you’re on their side. You’re not fixing the blame; you’re trying to fix the problem with their help.

Use the active voice to praise people.
Going back to our original example, we’ll bet you would feel great if your boss said, “You performed exceptionally well …”

Can you imagine how your performance would improve if your boss said something like that to you in front of all your co-workers? This is an incredible tool for managers to improve the morale of their troops.

So when you want to tell someone that they did something great, use your active voice. Put them first in your sentences. You’ll feel great because you’ll make them feel great!

Subscribe to the Bigg Success feed so you get more great personal and professional development tips delivered to you daily.

Subscribe to us in iTunes (click here)
Subscribe to us in your favorite reader (click here)

Our bigg quote today comes from Abraham Lincoln:

“He has a right to criticize, who has the heart to help.”

Actively accentuate the positives and eliminate the negatives with your passive voice.

Next time, we’ll discuss how to deal with a difficult co-worker. Until then, here’s to your bigg success!

Related posts

When A Co-Worker Bad Mouths You

Don’t Use Rhetorical Questions to Impart Knowledge

Write Right

Relationship Building Blocks 

(Image by miamiamia)